Best Fiber Internet Providers | 2022 ISP Guide

Popular Internet Service Providers

Fiber is a great ingredient in a broadband diet. A fiber optic internet connection, which refers to the pulses of light that send data through thin cables, provides both immensely fast downloads and equally fast uploads, up to gig internet speeds.

Fiber, however, has to be built out from scratch at considerable cost, resulting in limited coverage. FCC data collected in June 2020 shows fiber is only available to about 44% of the U.S. So some providers employ a hybrid-fiber approach: They extend fiber to a neighborhood and then switch to cable or phone-based connections for the last mile. If you’re wondering which internet service providers (ISPs) made our rating, keep reading below to see where companies like Verizon, Spectrum, and AT&T place in the Best Fiber Internet Service Providers of 2022.

(Chinnapong)

Best Fiber Internet Providers of 2022

RCN Internet »

3.8 out of 5

Monthly Cost $29.99 and Up
Connection Type Fiber, Cable
Download Speed (Mbps) 50 Mbps – 940 Mbps
See Review »
RCN Internet »

3.8 out of 5

Company

$29.99 and Up Monthly Cost
Fiber, Cable Connection Type
50 Mbps – 940 Mbps Download Speed (Mbps)
See Review »
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Spectrum Internet promotion price is $49.99/mo for 12 months. Wireless speeds may vary.

Best Overall 

Xfinity is best for:

  • Existing Xfinity customers who are eligible for discounts for bundled services

  • Customers looking for a system that uses equipment from one company for maximum compatibility

  • Customers who want a single bill for their home security, cable TV, and internet services

Xfinity is not recommended for:

  • Those who want a video doorbell, which is not yet available

  • People who are not Xfinity customers and thus won’t benefit from Xfinity Home’s discounts and integration with other services

Connection Type
Fiber, Cable

Download Speed
50 Mbps – 2,000 Mbps

Bundles
Internet, TV, Phone, or Home Security

Xfinity Internet: Xfinity places No. 1 in our rating of the Best Fiber Internet Service Providers of 2022 and is the Best ISP Overall in our ratings. It’s available in 39 states and Washington, D.C., and offers eight plans: six cable plans and two fiber ones. Its cable plans range from $45 to $105.95, with download speeds up to 50 megabits per second (Mbps) and upload speeds from 15 to 20 Mbps.

As for its fiber plans, Xfinity’s Gigabit plan starts at $110.95 per month and has download speeds up to 1,200 Mbps and an upload speed of 35 Mbps. The fastest speeds in our rating belong to Xfinity’s Gigabit Pro plan, which starts at $299 a month and provides matching upload and download speeds up to 2,000 Mbps (2 gigabits).

See Full Review »

Most Flexible Fiber Plans 

Verizon Internet is best for:

  • Users who need fast uploads as well as downloads

  • Anybody who doesn’t want a data cap

  • People not looking for discounts on bundles of internet, TV, and phone service

Verizon Internet is not recommended for:

  • Shoppers who prioritize getting TV and internet from the same provider

  • Price-minded customers who can get by with a slower connection

  • People who need download speeds above one gigabit per second.

Connection Type
Fiber

Download Speed
200 Mbps – 940 Mbps

Bundles
Internet, TV, or Phone

Verizon Internet: Verizon – ties for second place in our Best Internet Service Providers of 2022 rating – sells fiber broadband on a no-contract, no-data-cap basis. Rates start at $39.99 a month for 200 Mbps each way and go up to $79.99 for near-gigabit speeds – and don’t increase after the first year. The Fios gateway costs $15 a month to rent or $299.99 to buy outright, but if you only get Fios internet and not TV, you can use your own Wi-Fi router.

Verizon, however, only sells Fios in and around some Northeast metro areas. Outside them, the company can only offer a digital subscriber line (DSL) that’s just an upgrade from dial-up.

See Full Review »

AT&T Internet is best for:

  • People who need fast upload speeds

  • Shoppers looking for the fastest possible connection

  • Residents of urban areas who can get its fiber service

AT&T Internet is not recommended for:

  • People living in rural areas or planning to move there

  • People looking for bundled deals on internet and TV

  • Shoppers seeking download speeds beyond 1 Gbps

Connection Type
Fiber

Download Speed
0.8 Mbps – 940 Mbps

Bundles
Internet, TV

AT&T Internet: AT&T ties for second place in our Best Internet Service Providers of 2022 rating and offers fiber with few compromises. Its fiber-to-the-home service, starting at $35 for 100 Mbps each way, no longer includes data caps. However, its advertised rates omit a mandatory $10 per month hardware fee, a price increase after the first year, and required 12-month contract.

Outside urban service areas, AT&T offers a pricier hybrid-fiber service with downloads that go no faster than 100 Mbps. It has the same hardware fee and contracts as its fiber service, and all but the fastest hybrid-fiber option come with a 1 terabyte (TB) data cap.

See Full Review »

Best ISP for Rural Areas 

Spectrum is best for:

  • People who don’t want to worry about a data cap

  • Customers looking for a traditional bundle of internet and TV service

  • Shoppers looking for a provider with some of the widest possible coverage

Spectrum is not recommended for:

  • Users who require fast upload speeds

  • Budget-minded shoppers who don’t need especially fast downloads

Connection Type
Hybrid-Fiber Coax

Download Speed
100 Mbps – 1,000 Mbps

Bundles
Internet, TV, or Phone

Spectrum: This cable operator ties for fourth in our Best Internet Service Providers of 2022 rating. It’s been adding fiber connectivity in its network, but almost all of its residential customers still have traditional coaxial cable going into their homes. So while Spectrum can offer fiber-fast downloads, starting at 100 Mbps and increasing to 1,000 Mbps for $49.99, its uploads are much slower.

Spectrum’s rates, like most, increase after the first year. This company, however, dispenses with three other common broadband practices by not imposing a data cap, including a (non-Wi-Fi) modem in its cost of service, and not requiring a contract.

See Full Review »

Spectrum Internet promotion price is $49.99/mo for 12 months. Wireless speeds may vary.

Monthly Cost

$29.99 and Up

Most Affordable 940 Mbps Plan 

RCN is best for:

  • Customers interested in the latest technology

  • People who want to use their own equipment

RCN is not recommended for:

  • Consumers who need true gigabit speeds

Connection Type
Fiber, Cable

Download Speed
50 Mbps – 940 Mbps

Bundles
Internet, TV, Phone

RCN: This small cable operator also ties for fourth in our Best Internet Service Providers of 2022 rating. It sells a mostly-cable, part-fiber service but, unlike almost every other cable broadband provider – does so in direct competition to older cable operators. Its base rates, starting at $29.99 for 50 Mbps downloads and going up to at least $49.99 for 940 Mbps, with increases after the first year – aren’t too outside the usual for cable. However, RCN imposes no data caps and does not require 12-month contracts. RCN does charge $10 a month to rent a modem, a fee you can avoid by buying your own.

See Full Review »

Cox Internet is best for:

  • Included mesh Wi-Fi router

Cox Internet is not recommended for:

  • Those who want to pay month-to-month

  • Customers who don’t want a data cap

Connection Type
Fiber, Cable

Download Speed
25 Mbps – 940 Mbps

Bundles
Internet, TV, Phone, or Automation/Security

Cox: Cox, a privately-held provider that fills out a three-way tie for fourth place in our Best Internet Service Providers of 2022 rating, operates a network that’s mostly cable but includes some fiber service areas. Service starts at $44.99 a month for 25 Mbps and tops out at $119.99 for 940 Mbps, with a 1.25 TB data cap and fairly large (but fairly disclosed) rate hikes after the first year. Cox requires a 12-month contract but does let you save its modem-rental fee by buying your own.

See Full Review »

Best ISP for Gaming 

Frontier is best for:

  • Households that need lots of data

Frontier is not recommended for:

  • High-use internet households (if fiber internet isn’t available)

  • Households that need DSL speeds in excess of 115 megabits per second (Mbps)

Connection Type
Fiber, DSL

Download Speed
Up to 940 Mbps

Bundles
Internet, TV, or Phone

Frontier: Frontier, ties for seventh place in our Best Internet Service Providers of 2022 rating. It offers fiber optic connectivity across parts of its service area in some southern and western states, courtesy of it having bought Verizon’s Fios business in those areas. Frontier’s fiber speeds start at 50 Mbps each way and max out at 940 Mbps down and 880 Mbps up, with rates as low as $29.99 and no data caps or contracts required. As with Verizon, service outside fiber areas can be much slower and in some cases not much better than dial-up.

See Full Review »

CenturyLink is best for:

  • Those who want to lock in a plan price

  • People who don’t want to sign a contract

  • Households that use a lot of data

CenturyLink is not recommended for:

  • Customers who want to bundle services

  • People who want excellent customer service

  • Those who live in an area with slower DSL speeds

Connection Type
Fiber, DSL

Download Speed
10 Mbps – 940 Mbps

Bundles
Internet, TV, or Phone

CenturyLink: CenturyLink, the broadband brand of Lumen Technologies, shares a tie with Frontier for seventh place in our Best Internet Service Providers of 2022 rating. It provides a mix of full fiber and hybrid-fiber service across much of the United States. Its 100 Mbps fiber plan starts at $49 a month, while 940 Mbps fiber begins at $69. The cheaper and slower plan includes a 1 TB data cap, while the faster and pricier option provides unlimited data. Neither requires a contract. There is a $15 modem-rental fee, but you can also buy one upfront.

See Full Review »

Most Affordable ISP 

Suddenlink is best for:

  • Budget-conscious shoppers

  • Those looking to customize their internet plan

Suddenlink is not recommended for:

  • People looking for consistent pricing

  • Those who want a lower-priced plan without data caps

Connection Type
Fiber, Cable

Download Speed
20 Mbps – 940 Mbps

Bundles
Internet, TV, or Phone

Suddenlink: This brand of Altice USA, the company also behind Optimum, occupies 12th place on our Best Internet Service Providers of 2022 rating. The Optimum network is mostly cable with some fiber components, as you can see in upload speeds (2 to 50 Mbps) that can’t keep up with download speeds (20 to 940 Mbps). Starting rates go from $20 to $75 a month, with no contract required; its slower plans come with data caps that can run as low as 250 GB. Suddenlink charges $10 a month for a modem but lets you buy your own.

See Full Review »

Available in:

  • Alabama
  • Arizona
  • Arkansas
  • California
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Delaware
  • District Of Columbia
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Idaho
  • Illinois
  • Indiana
  • Kansas
  • Kentucky
  • Louisiana
  • Maine
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Mississippi
  • Missouri
  • New Hampshire
  • New Jersey
  • New Mexico
  • New York
  • North Carolina
  • Ohio
  • Oregon
  • Pennsylvania
  • South Carolina
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Utah
  • Vermont
  • Virginia
  • Washington
  • West Virginia
  • Wisconsin
  • Alabama
  • Arizona
  • Arkansas
  • California
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Delaware
  • District Of Columbia
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Idaho
  • Illinois
  • Indiana
  • Kansas
  • Kentucky
  • Louisiana
  • Maine
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Mississippi
  • Missouri
  • New Hampshire
  • New Jersey
  • New Mexico
  • New York
  • North Carolina
  • Ohio
  • Oregon
  • Pennsylvania
  • South Carolina
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Utah
  • Vermont
  • Virginia
  • Washington
  • West Virginia
  • Wisconsin

See all

Because telecom companies can’t reuse old phone or cable lines to build out fiber, it’s usually harder to find than phone or DSL connectivity. Our Fiber ISP availability map offers general guidance about where in the U.S. you can find a fiber connection, and you can also see which providers offer service near you by checking the Federal Communications Commission’s Fixed Broadband Deployment locator. But to know for sure, you’ll have to visit an internet provider’s site and plug in a specific address to see what rate plans it lists. Be wary of plans sold as “fiber-based” or “hybrid fiber,” since those usually involve cable or phone-based links for the last mile and so won’t deliver the fast upload speeds of a fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) connection.

The availability of fiber internet has increased greatly since 2002 when one study found only 50,000 homes in the U.S. had access to all-fiber connectivity; today, a recent study from the Fiber Broadband Association found 1,000-times more homes had fiber access.

If fiber internet is not available in your area, you’ll have to consider another broadband service – cable will usually be your best choice, followed by DSL or satellite. Learn about your high-speed internet options in our guide to the Best Internet Service Providers of 2022.

Internet Speed of Fiber vs DSL vs Cable vs Satellite

Features Fiber DSL Cable Satellite
Download Speed 0.2 Mbps – 2,000 Mbps 0.20 Mbps – 940 Mbps 10 Mbps – 2,000 Mbps 12 Mbps – 100 Mbps
Upload Speed 0.128 Mbps – 1,000 Mbps 0.128 Mbps – 940 Mbps 1 Mbps – 1,000 Mbps 3 Mbps
Latency 12 ms – 33 ms 19.5 ms – 51 ms 22 ms – 28 ms 610 ms
Packet Loss 0% – 1% 0% – 1% 0% – 1% >1%

*Speed usage data from FCC website.

Over the last decade, the entry-level speed for fiber optic connectivity has gone from under 20 Mbps to 100 Mbps – a testimony to this technology’s ability to scale up to meet demand. Most providers of full-fiber service offer symmetric download and upload speeds, so your service should run as fast if you’re receiving or sending files. Mid-tier speeds range from 200 to 600 Mbps, and most fiber providers offer a gigabit or near-gigabit tier, meaning downloads and uploads at or near 1,000 Mbps or 1 gigabit per second (Gbps).

In a hybrid-fiber system such as those many cable operators now deploy, there’s a much broader range of speeds possible. Uploads can get a little faster than pure-cable uploads but they won’t be symmetric, while the minimum download speeds can increase to 100 Mbps.

You can usually sign up for some form of fiber broadband for under $50 a month, sometimes well under; for example, the most affordable Verizon Fios plan, a 200 Mbps option, runs $39.99 a month. Upgrading to gigabit speeds will push you to the $75 to $300 range, especially for 2 Gbps with Xfinity’s Gigabit Pro plan. Some fiber providers – notably, CenturyLink and Xfinity – impose a data cap that can add extra costs.

As with any other form of broadband you also have to factor in non-promotional rates that run above the advertised costs for plans. AT&T, CenturyLink, and Frontier – along with all of the hybrid-fiber cable providers covered here – will increase your rates after a year or two, and many embed those rate increases on their site. Verizon, however, does not.

Finally, remember equipment costs. Fiber and hybrid-fiber providers typically charge $10 to $15 a month to rent their gateway, and most (but not AT&T) also let you buy your own to avoid that ongoing cost. In some pure-fiber situations, like an internet-only setup for Verizon Fios, you can run an Ethernet cable from the optical network terminal (the permanent box that brings the fiber cables into your house) to any standard Wi-Fi router.

?

  1. Check Availability: Fiber internet is not available everywhere, and your odds of having it decrease as you get further from densely-built areas. To learn if it is offered in your market, see our Which Fiber Internet Service Is Near Me? section above.
  2. Choose a Plan: Fiber providers generally start with very high download speeds, so even an entry-level plan should offer enough capacity for most household uses, and upgrading to a faster plan should be an easy step that doesn’t require a technician’s visit. But watch for data caps on cheaper plans that may be waived on slightly more expensive ones – and, with hybrid-fiber cable providers, remember to check upload speeds too. Finally, verify what you’ll pay after the first year or two of service.
  3. Get Equipment: If your residence doesn’t have a specialized box called an Optical Network Terminal to bring fiber’s pulses of light into your home network, you’ll need one. Learn more in our What Do I Need for Fiber Internet Service? section, and get additional tips in our Should I Buy or Rent Equipment for Fiber Internet Service? section.
  4. Set Up Service: Schedule installation, set up your Wi-Fi network, connect devices, and enjoy your faster connection. Learn more in our How Do I Install Equipment for Fiber Internet Service? section below.

What Do I Need for Fiber Internet Service?

  • Access to a Fiber Network.
  • Optical Network Terminal (ONT): This device translates pulses of light from the fiber optic cable into standard internet packets that your computer can work with, and vice versa. The box is installed outside or inside your home and plugs into a standard three-prong electrical outlet.
  • Battery Backup: The ONT may come with a battery backup that can keep the fiber internet and telephone service, if ordered, operating for some time during a power outage.
  • Wi-Fi Router: Some fiber internet services provide gateways that include wireless routers, while others let you use your own router. You may, however, need to replace your existing router if its wireless speeds fall short of the fiber connection.
  • Installation Appointment: If you are switching from DSL, cable, or satellite internet in a residence that hasn’t had fiber before – as in, there’s no ONT installed – you will need to schedule a professional installation.

Should I Buy or Rent Equipment for Fiber Internet Service?

Buying Equipment – Fiber Internet Service

Renting Equipment – Fiber Internet Service

  • You save money in the long run.

  • It’s easier to change plans or service providers.

  • You get technical support.

  • You get the latest technology.

  • You are the tech support.

  • You pay to replace faulty devices.

  • Owned devices may not be compatible.

  • It will cost more long term.

  • Monthly rental fees can increase.

  • You’ll pay a fee for not returning equipment

Buying Equipment – Fiber Internet Service

  • You save money in the long run.

  • It’s easier to change plans or service providers.

  • You are the tech support.

  • You pay to replace faulty devices.

  • Owned devices may not be compatible.


Renting Equipment – Fiber Internet Service

  • You get technical support.

  • You get the latest technology.

  • It will cost more long term.

  • Monthly rental fees can increase.

  • You’ll pay a fee for not returning equipment

As with other broadband services, it makes financial sense to buy a gateway or router for fiber internet service instead of renting whatever your provider will issue you. With providers typically charging $10 or $15 a month for that rental, you should be able to recover even the cost of a high-end model in a year or two at most. You’ll also be able to choose a Wi-Fi router that works for you – and then take it with you if you switch providers.

Some fiber services (for instance, Frontier and Verizon) require either a specialized router or an adapter for a standard Wi-Fi router because they usually run a “MoCA” coaxial cable from the ONT that can carry both internet and TV signals. If you only get internet, you should be able to run a standard Ethernet cable from the ONT to the Wi-Fi router of your choice.

Cable operators with hybrid-fiber networks don’t use an ONT and do need a standard cable modem, so you’ll have to buy one that your provider has approved. In either case, your use of your own modem may lead to a little pushback from tech support – they do have to help with the broadband connection but probably won’t offer router help.

Renting a modem should eliminate that potential hiccup and simplify your initial setup, but the finances always argue against that unless you’ll also be moving within a year or so. Note that if you use AT&T, you have no choice: the company requires the use of its own hardware at $10 a month. In most cases with equipment rental, you’ll likely pay a fee if you fail to return the equipment.

How Do I Install Equipment for Fiber Internet Service?

Self-installing a router for fiber internet is best for:

  • Homes with an ONT (or hybrid-fiber cable) already in place

  • People used to wireless-network setup

Hiring a professional to install fiber internet equipment is best for:

  • Homes without an ONT or one that needs replacement

  • Houses that need cable run from an ONT to a new location

  • Users averse to wireless-network configuration

If your home already has fiber cable running to a functioning ONT that in turn has a MoCA or Ethernet cable running to a convenient spot for a Wi-Fi router, setting up a new router should be no harder than in any other context. Just make sure it supports your new connection’s speeds, as some older routers won’t have sufficiently fast wireless. If your fiber provider uses MoCA (a coaxial cable that carries both TV and internet), you’ll need an adapter for your router or one of the few models that support this connection standard.

If seeing jargon like “MoCA” makes you cringe, you may prefer to rent a fiber gateway that will already be set up for your system. Requesting professional installation for that, however, will probably come at an extra cost.

You will definitely need professional installation if your home doesn’t have an ONT has one that isn’t working properly or is obsolete. (You may also want one if you need additional inside wiring, but if you’ve replaced an electrical outlet you can probably run cable from an ONT’s spot to a nearby outlet.) Installation fees range from free to more than $99. The ONT typically occupies a spot in a basement, garage, or utility closet. Verizon advises budgeting four to six hours for an ONT installation.

Cable is good for:

  • Streaming video, file sharing, online gaming

  • More consistent service delivery

Fiber is good for:

  • Streaming high-definition video and playing real-time multiplayer games online

  • Telecommuters who videoconference and share large files

Fiber and cable internet can both offer high download speeds, but fiber optic connections (not the hybrid-fiber services of some cable providers) can offer uploads that are as fast as those downloads. That makes fiber a much better choice for anybody who needs to send as well as receive large files – for instance, anybody who began working from home since the start of the pandemic.

Fiber also offers much higher capacity and should never suffer a slowdown even if all of your neighbors jump online, which can be an issue with cable networks. And fiber generally has slightly lower latency, although you’re unlikely to see that anywhere but in online gaming.

Cable internet, however, is vastly more available, especially outside of built-up areas in which fiber is more economically viable to build out. And for streaming-only or mostly-streaming households, cable’s slower upload speeds won’t matter as much. Customers who don’t need a particularly fast connection may also find some deals at the low end of a cable provider’s rate list.

DSL is good for:

  • Extremely light internet use

  • People who do not want to do business with the local cable provider

Fiber is good for:

  • Fast downloads as well as uploads

  • Anybody who may need a faster connection later on.

In most markets, fiber versus phone-based digital-subscriber-line service isn’t a choice – once a telecom company has upgraded a telephone network to add fiber capability, it stops selling DSL. Should both DSL and fiber somehow be available, there is no good reason to opt for DSL over fiber unless you want to pay more for an exponentially slower connection. Even if fiber seems like more speed than you can use, you will probably find that you get accustomed to life in the fast lane of the internet.

DSL does, however, remain a possibility and is sometimes the only option in rural areas that haven’t seen upgrades to phone networks that would support fiber access. In those cases, it can provide a minimal connection that works for email and web browsing, plus maybe Voice over Internet Protocol phone calls. For some users, that may be enough. But for anybody looking to stream high-definition video or have multiple computers online, DSL will disappoint.

Other Internet Service Providers

Other Guides from 360 Reviews

Other Products to Consider

In addition to the companies in our rating of the Best Internet Service Providers, here are some others to consider:

The following describes our 360 approach to researching and analyzing internet service providers to guide prospective consumers.

1. We researched the companies and products people care most about.

U.S. News analyzed and compared a variety of publicly available data, including internet search data, to determine which internet service providers consumers are most interested in. We found 25 companies that stood out for further evaluation using the volume of searches and consumer research. After conducting a thorough analysis, we were able to condense the initial list to the 12 overall Best Internet Service Providers (ISPs). Taking a step further, out of the top 12 ISPs, we determined which is best by connection type, the best for gaming using latency (provided by the Federal Communications Commission) as a parameter, the best for rural areas, the best prepaid plans, and the cheapest in terms of the lowest regular rate. Fastest ISPs was also another sub-category to consider, but without the proper speed testing platform, this could not be captured appropriately. 360 Reviews instead offered consumers the fastest publicized ISP plans provided by our overall Best Internet Service Providers. With the companies determined, we researched their most important features to create a general layout of what consumers should know to assist with their purchasing decisions.

We compared the various plans, along with the monthly costs and associated fees that each company provided relative to its customers’ needs. The plans highlighted features such as connection type, download/upload speed, and data caps. We also considered the latency, consistency, and packet loss data provided by the Federal Communications Commission in regards to connection type and ISPs for gaming. With these factors in mind, we created a thorough set of guides that provides a 360 overview of what consumers should consider.

2. We created objective 360 Overall Ratings based on an analysis of third-party reviews.

Our scoring methodology is based on a composite analysis of the ratings and reviews published by credible third-party professional and consumer review sources. The ratings are not based on the personal opinions, tests, or experiences of U.S. News. To calculate the ratings:

(a) We compiled two types of third-party ratings and reviews:

Professional Ratings and Reviews: Many independent evaluating sources have published their assessments of internet service providers and products online. We consider several of these third-party reviews to be reputable and well-researched. However, professional reviewers often make recommendations that contradict one another. Rather than relying on a single source, U.S. News believes consumers benefit most when these opinions and recommendations are considered and analyzed collectively with an objective, consensus-based methodology.

Consumer Ratings and Reviews: U.S. News also reviewed published consumer ratings and reviews of internet service providers. Sources with a sufficient number of quality consumer ratings and reviews were included in our scoring model.

Please note that not all professional and consumer rating sources met our criteria for objectivity. Therefore, some sources were excluded from our model.

(b) We standardized the inputs to create a common scale.

The third-party review source data were collected in a variety of forms, including ratings, recommendations, and accolades. Before including each third-party data point in our scoring equation, we standardized it so that it could be compared accurately with data points from other review sources. We used the scoring methodology described below to convert these systems to a comparable scale.

The 360 scoring process first converted each third-party rating into a common 0 to 5 scale. To balance the distribution of scores within each source’s scale, we used a standard deviation (or Z-Score) calculation to determine how each company that a source rated was scored in comparison to the source’s mean score. We then used the Z-Score to create a standardized U.S. News score using the method outlined below:

Calculating the Z-Score: The Z-Score represents a data point’s relation to the mean measurement of the data set. The Z-Score is negative when the data point is below the mean and positive when it’s above the mean; a Z-Score of 0 means it’s equal to the mean. To determine the Z-Score for each third-party rating of a company, we calculated the mean of the ratings across all companies evaluated by that third-party source. We then subtracted the mean from the company’s rating and divided it by the standard deviation to produce the Z-Score.

Calculating the T-Score: We used a T-Score calculation to convert the Z-Score to a 0-100 scale by multiplying the Z-Score by 10. To ensure that the mean was equal across all data points, we added our desired scoring mean (between 0 and 10) to the T-Score to create an adjusted T-Score.

Calculating the common-scale rating: We divided the adjusted T-Score, which is on a 100-point scale, by 20 to convert the third-party rating to a common 0-5 point system.

(c) We calculated the 360 Overall Score based on a weighted average model.

We assigned “source weights” to each source used in the consensus scoring model based on our assessment of how much the source is trusted and recognized by consumers and how much its published review process indicates that it is both comprehensive and editorially independent. The source weights are assigned on a 1-5 scale. Any source with an assigned weight less than 2 was excluded from the consensus scoring model.

Finally, we combined the converted third-party data points using a weighted average formula based on source weight. This formula calculated the consensus score for each product, which we call the 360 Overall Rating.

†Limited time offer; subject to change; valid to qualified residential customers who have not subscribed to any services within the previous 30 days and who have no outstanding obligation to Charter. Spectrum Internet® promotion price is $49.99/mo; standard rates apply after yr. 1. Taxes, fees and surcharges extra and subject to change during and after the promotional period; installation/network activation, equipment and additional services are extra. General Terms: INTERNET: Speed based on wired connection and may vary by address. Wireless speeds may vary. Services subject to all applicable service terms and conditions, subject to change. Services not available in all areas. Restrictions apply.

U.S. News 360 Reviews takes an unbiased approach to our recommendations. When you use our links to buy products, we may earn a commission but that in no way affects our editorial independence.

https://www.usnews.com/360-reviews/services/internet-providers/fiber-internet

About: Bunga Citra