Fastest High Speed Internet | 2022 ISP Guide

Popular Internet Service Providers

Fast internet helps you perform online activities without the worry of freezing or buffering frames and connectivity issues. However, the fastest plan for you will depend on the providers available in your neighborhood. To find the fastest plan available for residential customers in your area, you can check various internet service plans and the reported average internet speeds.

Factors influencing the speed of the plan you select may include the type of internet, the price for the plan, and the amount of data available to you. In this guide, we help you narrow down your choices. Keep reading to see where plans from Xfinity, Mediacom, and Frontier place in our rating of the Fastest High-Speed Internet Service Providers of 2022.

(Drazen_)

Fastest Internet Providers of 2022

The Fastest Internet Plans ranking is based on the highest advertised download speeds. The listed download and upload speeds represent the full range of speeds the ISP offers.

Best Overall 

Xfinity is best for:

  • Existing Xfinity customers who are eligible for discounts for bundled services

  • Customers looking for a system that uses equipment from one company for maximum compatibility

  • Customers who want a single bill for their home security, cable TV, and internet services

Xfinity is not recommended for:

  • Those who want a video doorbell, which is not yet available

  • People who are not Xfinity customers and thus won’t benefit from Xfinity Home’s discounts and integration with other services

Connection Type
Fiber, Cable

Download Speed
50 Mbps – 2,000 Mbps

Bundles
Internet, TV, Phone, or Home Security

Xfinity: Xfinity is the Fastest High-Speed Internet Service Provider of 2022 thanks to its Gigabit Pro fiber internet plan with up to 2 gigabits per second (Gbps) download and upload speeds. The plan starts at $299 per month making it the most expensive plan in our rating. It has a data cap of 1.2 terabytes (TB) and a 12-month contract. It’s available in various states. Xfinity has one of the widest home internet coverage areas of all the ISPs in our rating.

The Gigabit Pro has enough bandwidth for those running a business from home, a household of extreme gamers, or those with multiple devices all connecting to the internet at once. If 2 Gbps seems like more than enough, Xfinity also has a lower-tier fiber plan, the Gigabit. It starts at $110.95 per month and has download speeds up to 1,200 megabits per second (Mbps) and upload speeds up to 35 Mbps. Xfinity offers six other cable plans with download speeds of 50 to 800 Mbps, costing between $45 and $105.95 a month.

See Full Review »

Mediacom is best for:

  • Those who want consistently fast speeds

  • Households that want mesh Wi-Fi

Mediacom is not recommended for:

  • Those who don’t want a data cap

  • Customers who don’t want to pay higher prices after a year

  • People who expect top customer service

Connection Type
Cable

Download Speed
60 Mbps – 1000 Mbps

Bundles
Internet, TV, or Phone

Mediacom: Mediacom ranks No. 2 in our rating of the Fastest High-Speed ISPs of 2022 and places No. 6 in our rating of the Best ISPs for Gaming. Its 1 Gig plan delivers download speeds up to 1,000 Mbps (1 Gbps) and 50 Mbps upload speed.

The plan has a data cap of 6,000 gigabytes (GB) and doesn’t require a contract. It costs $79.99 for the first year for new users and $139.99 for subsequent years. With this plan, Mediacom says everyone in your household can be on a device at the same time without losing speed.

See Full Review »

AT&T Internet is best for:

  • People who need fast upload speeds

  • Shoppers looking for the fastest possible connection

  • Residents of urban areas who can get its fiber service

AT&T Internet is not recommended for:

  • People living in rural areas or planning to move there

  • People looking for bundled deals on internet and TV

  • Shoppers seeking download speeds beyond 1 Gbps

Connection Type
Fiber

Download Speed
0.8 Mbps – 940 Mbps

Bundles
Internet, TV

AT&T Internet: AT&T places third in our rating of the Fastest High-Speed ISPs and fifth in our ratings of the Most Affordable ISPs of 2022. Its Internet 1000 data plan is a fiber internet plan offering up to 940 Mbps download speeds and similar upload speeds. AT&T says the plan will allow you to download a 1 GB file in under a minute and it’s good for streaming videos in 4K Ultra-high-definition (HD) on up to two devices.

The plan doesn’t have a data cap, but users may need to commit to a 12-month contract for the most competitive pricing. It normally costs $60 per month and is available in 21 states.

See Full Review »

Most Flexible Fiber Plans 

Verizon Internet is best for:

  • Users who need fast uploads as well as downloads

  • Anybody who doesn’t want a data cap

  • People not looking for discounts on bundles of internet, TV, and phone service

Verizon Internet is not recommended for:

  • Shoppers who prioritize getting TV and internet from the same provider

  • Price-minded customers who can get by with a slower connection

  • People who need download speeds above one gigabit per second.

Connection Type
Fiber

Download Speed
200 Mbps – 940 Mbps

Bundles
Internet, TV, or Phone

Verizon: Users looking to enjoy fast internet in the Northeastern U.S. can consider Verizon Fios. It places fourth in our ratings of the Fastest High-Speed ISPs of 2022 and second in the Best Fiber ISPs of 2022. The Verizon Fios Gigabit Connection is a fiber plan with up to 940 Mbps download speeds and up to 880 Mbps upload speeds.

Upload speeds are important for sending files (think videos and pictures too), gaming, and smooth video conferencing. Verizon emphasizes those speeds where some ISPs don’t. The Gigabit Connection starts at $79.99 per month, has unlimited data, and no contract is required.

Verizon also has two other fiber plans with matching download and upload speeds: a 200 Mbps plan and a 400 Mbps plan starting at $39.99 and $59.99 per month, respectively. In areas where Fios isn’t available Verizon offers DSL internet service. Read more in our Verizon review.

See Full Review »

Best ISP for Gaming 

Frontier is best for:

  • Households that need lots of data

Frontier is not recommended for:

  • High-use internet households (if fiber internet isn’t available)

  • Households that need DSL speeds in excess of 115 megabits per second (Mbps)

Connection Type
Fiber, DSL

Download Speed
Up to 940 Mbps

Bundles
Internet, TV, or Phone

Frontier: Frontier comes in at No. 6 in our rating for the Fastest High-Speed ISPs of 2022. Frontier also places No. 1 in our Best DSL Internet Service Providers rating and our Best ISPs for Gaming. Its FiberOptic 1Gig Service plan starts at $79.99 per month and includes download speeds up to 940 Mbps and upload speeds up to 880 Mbps. The plan has no data cap and is suitable for households with multiple devices, at-home business owners, online gamers, and smart homes.

See Full Review »

Available in:

  • Alabama
  • Arizona
  • Arkansas
  • California
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Delaware
  • District Of Columbia
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Idaho
  • Illinois
  • Indiana
  • Kansas
  • Kentucky
  • Louisiana
  • Maine
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Mississippi
  • Missouri
  • New Hampshire
  • New Jersey
  • New Mexico
  • New York
  • North Carolina
  • Ohio
  • Oregon
  • Pennsylvania
  • South Carolina
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Utah
  • Vermont
  • Virginia
  • Washington
  • West Virginia
  • Wisconsin
  • Alabama
  • Arizona
  • Arkansas
  • California
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Delaware
  • District Of Columbia
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Idaho
  • Illinois
  • Indiana
  • Kansas
  • Kentucky
  • Louisiana
  • Maine
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Mississippi
  • Missouri
  • New Hampshire
  • New Jersey
  • New Mexico
  • New York
  • North Carolina
  • Ohio
  • Oregon
  • Pennsylvania
  • South Carolina
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Utah
  • Vermont
  • Virginia
  • Washington
  • West Virginia
  • Wisconsin

See all

According to the FCC, about 60% of the U.S. can pick between two or more high-speed providers for DSL internet, cable internet, or fiber internet. If you include broadband satellite internet service, this increases to 91% of Americans.

Still, the fastest plans, which use fiber optic technology, might not be available in your ZIP code. The FCC says about a third of the U.S. population has access to a fiber internet provider. That translates to 46.5 million, according to the Fiber Broadband Association, though the good news is that this number is growing every year.

The providers in our Fastest High-Speed ISPs rating offer coverage across the U.S, though it isn’t always the company’s fiber service. Xfinity operates in 39 states and Washington, D.C.; Cox operates in 13 states; Frontier operates in 25. AT&T Internet provides service in California, the Southeast, and Midwest. Verizon has coverage in the New England and Mid-Atlantic regions.

No. of Devices Light Use Moderate Use High Use
1 user on 1 device Basic Basic Medium
2 users or devices at a time Basic Medium Medium/Advanced
3 users or devices at a time Medium Medium Advanced
4 users or devices at a time Medium Advanced Advanced

Basic Service = 3 to 8mpbs. Medium Service = 12 to 25 Mbps. Advanced Service = More than 25 Mbps. *Mbps (Megabits per second) is the standard measure of broadband speed. It refers to the speed with which information packets are downloaded from, or uploaded to, the internet. *Speed usage data from FCC website.

You can classify your internet speed needs by your online activities and the number of devices you have connected at once. Basic service has average internet speeds of 3 to 8 Mbps, medium service has speeds of 12 to 25 Mbps, and advanced service has speeds above 25 Mbps.

If you only use the internet for email, browsing, light video streaming, voice calls, and internet radio, the basic internet service is adequate for you. This speed is sufficient for having one or two devices connected at once. However, if you intend to connect three or four devices for these functions, consider the medium service.

If you are the only user and are using a single device at a time, you can still perform other functions such as telecommuting, streaming HD videos, videoconferencing, and light online gaming. However, if you are going to use two or three devices for these activities, you should consider medium service internet.

Keep in mind that the more devices you use, the more users you add, and the more high-demand applications you run, the further your household moves into the high-use range. That equates to advanced level internet service and several companies in our Fastest High-Speed ISPs rating offer a plan for that.

According to the FCC, high-speed internet refers to internet with speeds above 25 Mbps. To find the average cost of high-speed internet, you should check the internet plans available in your area and their average download speeds. Below are the Internet Service Providers discussed in this guide and the cost of each provider’s high-speed internet plans.

Xfinity’s Gigabit Pro fiber internet plan starts at $299 per month. While this is the costliest plan in our ratings, it is also the fastest as it offers upload and download speeds up to 2 Gbps. The plan is a 12-month contract plan, and it has a data cap of 1.2 TB. For new users, the installation fee varies, and if you cancel your plan early, there are varying termination fees.

Another high-speed internet plan is Mediacom’s 1 Gig cable internet plan. It is a no-contract plan and new customers can pay $79.99 per month for their first year while other customers pay a monthly fee of $139.99. The plan has download speeds up to 1 Gbps and upload speeds up to 50 Mbps. There is a data cap of 6,000 GB and new subscribers pay an installation fee of $99.

AT&T Internet has the Internet 1000 plan for users looking to get low-cost high-speed internet. At $60 per month, it is the most affordable plan in our rating of the Fastest High-Speed ISPs. It offers download speeds up to 940 Mbp, upload speeds up to 940 Mbps, and doesn’t have a data cap. Installation can be free but there are termination fees if you enter a one- or two-year contract with AT&T and then break the contract early.

Verizon’s Gigabit Connection plan starts at $79.99. The plan has download speeds up to 940 Mbps and upload speeds up to 880 Mbps. There’s no contract required and no data cap. However, if you’re a new customer, installation fees start at $99.

Frontier’s FiberOptic 1Gig Service plan starts at $79.99 per month. It includes 940 Mbps download speeds and up to 880 Mbps upload speeds. There’s no contract and no data cap on this plan. It’s suitable for families with 10 to 15 devices online at once, people who work from home, or those who run a business from home. Frontier’s installation fee starts at $75.

  1. Locate an internet provider: High-speed internet is available in most markets. To see which states our Best Internet Service Providers offer service in, see our map.
  2. Pick the plan: Most providers offer multiple high-speed plans. Choose a good match for your online activities without overspending for an internet speed you may not need. Keep in mind that additional fees and taxes will increase your total monthly bill.
  3. Consider equipment: Equipment will vary depending on the type of internet connection. Learn more in our What Do I Need for High-Speed Internet Service? and Should I Buy or Rent High-Speed Internet Equipment? sections below.
  4. Get connected: Install and set up the equipment you need to connect to the internet. You can manage this yourself or have it professionally done by your internet provider’s tech. Your final step is to set up your Wi-Fi network and connect your devices. We list the basic DIY steps in our section on self-installing high-speed internet equipment.

What Do I Need for High-Speed Internet Service?

  • Modem or optical network terminal: This device brings your internet provider’s network into your home. You can usually rent it from your provider, and some company’s let you use your own device, so long as it’s compatible. The type of device depends on the type of internet connection: Fiber internet requires an optical network terminal (ONT). For cable and DSL, you need a DOCSIS (Document Over Cable Service Interface Specification) modem compatible with your plan’s speed. Satellite broadband requires a specially configured modem, which is provided by the internet service.
  • Wi-Fi router: This device connects to the modem and uses radio frequency to create an in-home Wi-Fi network so you can operate your wireless devices, like smartphones, tablets, gaming consoles, and video streaming devices such as Apple TV and Roku.
  • Special equipment: Satellite internet requires a satellite dish antenna, which the internet provider installs. For fiber internet, you may want a built-in battery backup for the ONT, which runs on electricity.
  • Other equipment: Depending on where your modem is in relation to other devices in your home, you may need extra equipment to get online. The list may include coaxial cables, ethernet cables, and Wi-Fi extenders or amplifiers to boost the wireless signal in the house.
  • Installation appointment: This optional service depends on your technical abilities, the setup in your home, and the type of internet you are adding. In many cases, you can self-install equipment for cable and DSL. Fiber and satellite broadband require professional installation.

Should I Buy or Rent Equipment for High-Speed Internet Service?

Buying Equipment – High-Speed Internet Service

Renting Equipment – High-Speed Internet Service

  • It’s less expensive long-term

  • You have a greater selection

  • It’s easier to change ISPs

  • You’re covered if it breaks

  • It might not be an option

  • If equipment breaks, you’ll have to buy new

  • It’s more expensive long-term

  • You’ll be charged a fee for not returning equipment

Buying Equipment – High-Speed Internet Service

  • It’s less expensive long-term

  • You have a greater selection

  • It’s easier to change ISPs

  • It might not be an option

  • If equipment breaks, you’ll have to buy new


Renting Equipment – High-Speed Internet Service

  • You’re covered if it breaks

  • It’s more expensive long-term

  • You’ll be charged a fee for not returning equipment

You should buy equipment for high-speed internet service if you want to save money in the long run or you want to choose from a greater selection of equipment. It can be faster and easier to switch internet providers when you already have the necessary equipment. But depending on your high-speed internet connection, buying equipment may not be an option as some devices, like a satellite dish antenna and modems for satellite internet service, must be rented from the provider. Another disadvantage: If the equipment you own breaks or is outdated, you’re on the hook to buy a replacement.

You should rent equipment for high-speed internet service if you like convenience. The internet company typically provides the most up-to-date, compatible devices, offers technical support, and will replace a device that breaks. Renting equipment also is required for satellite internet. Renting, however, costs more over time and monthly rental fees may increase. You’ll also be charged if you do not return rented equipment after terminating service.

Sometimes there is no option between renting and buying. For example, you are required to rent the equipment for satellite internet.

How Do I Install Equipment for High-Speed Service?

Self-installing high-speed internet equipment is best for:

  • People who want to save time and money

Hiring a professional to install high-speed internet equipment is best for:

  • People who have limited technical know-how

  • Fiber and satellite internet

  • More complex installation jobs

Self-installing high-speed internet equipment is best for people who have some technical experience and are comfortable connecting devices. This option can save you money when your household needs only basic cable and DSL equipment and the installation is straightforward. Self-installing also saves time, as you don’t have to wait for a technician to show up.

Hiring a professional to install high-speed internet equipment is best for subscribers who aren’t familiar with technology and want an expert to set up the system. It is required to install an optical network terminal (ONT) for fiber internet and a dish antenna and modem for satellite internet. Professional installation is also recommended for complex jobs. These may involve multiple pieces of equipment, or when a home isn’t properly wired, has connection issues, or hasn’t had internet service in more than a year.

  • Turn off connected devices if you are not using them. Your internet connection can slow down with every device that is online. For example, an always-on smart home device often checks for updates regularly, which will use up a portion of your bandwidth.
  • Reboot the modem and router. Unplug the power cords, wait one minute, and plug them back in. Restart connected devices on a regular basis.
  • Monitor data usage. Internet providers throttle speed if you exceed the data plan. Check your bill or talk to a customer service representative to see how much data you typically use each month.
  • Replace an older or failing modem or router. Talk with your provider to see if replacing your equipment can help improve your internet speed.
  • Boost Wi-Fi. You won’t get optimal internet speeds on your wireless devices when your Wi-Fi signal is getting blocked. Place the router in a central, unobstructed location off the ground. You can also password-protect the wireless network to prevent unauthorized use, and install extenders to boost the signal to areas where the Wi-Fi is weak.
  • Improve satellite reception. Those with satellite internet should check their dish. You may need to trim branches away from the dish antenna or have your provider send a technician to reposition the dish.
  • Check your VPN. If your VPN is slowing down your internet experience, consider switching to a new VPN service.
  • Call for service to check for issues outside the home. A loose connection in an exterior utility box may be the cause. Your provider can send a technician to test for this and look for other potential problems.
  • Find a new internet provider that delivers more speed. Check our map to see which providers are available in your state, and check out our rating of the Best Internet Providers.

Internet Service Providers

Other Guides from 360 Reviews

Other Products to Consider

In addition to the companies in our rating of the Best Internet Service Providers, here are some others to consider:

The following describes our 360 approach to researching and analyzing internet service providers to guide prospective consumers.

1. We researched the companies and products people care most about.

U.S. News analyzed and compared a variety of publicly available data, including internet search data, to determine which internet service providers consumers are most interested in. We found 25 companies that stood out for further evaluation using the volume of searches and consumer research. After conducting a thorough analysis, we were able to condense the initial list to the 12 overall Best Internet Service Providers (ISPs). Taking a step further, out of the top 12 ISPs, we determined which is best by connection type, the best for gaming using latency (provided by the Federal Communications Commission) as a parameter, the best for rural areas, the best prepaid plans, and the cheapest in terms of the lowest regular rate. Fastest ISPs was also another sub-category to consider, but without the proper speed testing platform, this could not be captured appropriately. 360 Reviews instead offered consumers the fastest publicized ISP plans provided by our overall Best Internet Service Providers. With the companies determined, we researched their most important features to create a general layout of what consumers should know to assist with their purchasing decisions.

We compared the various plans, along with the monthly costs and associated fees that each company provided relative to its customers’ needs. The plans highlighted features such as connection type, download/upload speed, and data caps. We also considered the latency, consistency, and packet loss data provided by the Federal Communications Commission in regards to connection type and ISPs for gaming. With these factors in mind, we created a thorough set of guides that provides a 360 overview of what consumers should consider.

2. We created objective 360 Overall Ratings based on an analysis of third-party reviews.

Our scoring methodology is based on a composite analysis of the ratings and reviews published by credible third-party professional and consumer review sources. The ratings are not based on the personal opinions, tests, or experiences of U.S. News. To calculate the ratings:

(a) We compiled two types of third-party ratings and reviews:

Professional Ratings and Reviews: Many independent evaluating sources have published their assessments of internet service providers and products online. We consider several of these third-party reviews to be reputable and well-researched. However, professional reviewers often make recommendations that contradict one another. Rather than relying on a single source, U.S. News believes consumers benefit most when these opinions and recommendations are considered and analyzed collectively with an objective, consensus-based methodology.

Consumer Ratings and Reviews: U.S. News also reviewed published consumer ratings and reviews of internet service providers. Sources with a sufficient number of quality consumer ratings and reviews were included in our scoring model.

Please note that not all professional and consumer rating sources met our criteria for objectivity. Therefore, some sources were excluded from our model.

(b) We standardized the inputs to create a common scale.

The third-party review source data were collected in a variety of forms, including ratings, recommendations, and accolades. Before including each third-party data point in our scoring equation, we standardized it so that it could be compared accurately with data points from other review sources. We used the scoring methodology described below to convert these systems to a comparable scale.

The 360 scoring process first converted each third-party rating into a common 0 to 5 scale. To balance the distribution of scores within each source’s scale, we used a standard deviation (or Z-Score) calculation to determine how each company that a source rated was scored in comparison to the source’s mean score. We then used the Z-Score to create a standardized U.S. News score using the method outlined below:

Calculating the Z-Score: The Z-Score represents a data point’s relation to the mean measurement of the data set. The Z-Score is negative when the data point is below the mean and positive when it’s above the mean; a Z-Score of 0 means it’s equal to the mean. To determine the Z-Score for each third-party rating of a company, we calculated the mean of the ratings across all companies evaluated by that third-party source. We then subtracted the mean from the company’s rating and divided it by the standard deviation to produce the Z-Score.

Calculating the T-Score: We used a T-Score calculation to convert the Z-Score to a 0-100 scale by multiplying the Z-Score by 10. To ensure that the mean was equal across all data points, we added our desired scoring mean (between 0 and 10) to the T-Score to create an adjusted T-Score.

Calculating the common-scale rating: We divided the adjusted T-Score, which is on a 100-point scale, by 20 to convert the third-party rating to a common 0-5 point system.

(c) We calculated the 360 Overall Score based on a weighted average model.

We assigned “source weights” to each source used in the consensus scoring model based on our assessment of how much the source is trusted and recognized by consumers and how much its published review process indicates that it is both comprehensive and editorially independent. The source weights are assigned on a 1-5 scale. Any source with an assigned weight less than 2 was excluded from the consensus scoring model.

Finally, we combined the converted third-party data points using a weighted average formula based on source weight. This formula calculated the consensus score for each product, which we call the 360 Overall Rating.

U.S. News 360 Reviews takes an unbiased approach to our recommendations. When you use our links to buy products, we may earn a commission but that in no way affects our editorial independence.

https://www.usnews.com/360-reviews/services/internet-providers/high-speed-internet

About: Bunga Citra